Header Ad

Most Viewed Posts

LOCAL REFLECTS ON CAREER, LAWSUIT VERSUS THE NFL

Many months have passed, but the obvious still remains. The New Orleans Saints were robbed of a chance at going to the Super Bowl because of a missed pass interference call.
One local knows that better than anyone.
After the call happened, he used his knowledge of the legal system to try and enact change to how the league does business in tumultuous situations.
Galliano native Tommy Badeaux was the architect of the highly publicized lawsuit against the National Football League in the days following the Saints/Rams games.
On the official court documents filed, it reads Badeaux v. Roger Goodell.
The attorney, who works for the Law Offices of Frank D’Amico Jr. in Metairie said the entire experience was memorable — one which helped him grow in his young career. He said he never expected to fully topple the billion-dollar giant that is the NFL, but his efforts were not altogether in vein, as the league has now altered their rules to prevent another blown call from costing a team in the future.

“I like that I get to help people on a daily basis because that is essentially what I believe being a lawyer is all centered
upon. Someone comes to you with a problem, an injury or a particular
issue that they need help and/or guidance with and they seek out your professional advice and then trust you to take care of their legal needs as their advocate or their voice in a court room.”

– Tommy Badeaux

“That process was a whirlwind of emotion, legal research, perfect timing and tons of creativity,” Badeaux said, looking back. “We caught so much flack in the (national) media about the case — being called ‘poor sports’ and plenty of other names, but I still feel that the Badeaux v. Goodell lawsuit had merit. I think it was the epitome of what I stand for in that I took it upon myself to stand for the everyday citizens against the giant corporation that is the NFL and its commissioner. … It was a great learning experience and, if for anything, it just goes to show that if I’m willing to sue a powerful entity like the NFL to do what’s right, then just imagine what I’m willing to do to help my clients on a daily basis.”

“What happened on that infamous Sunday was nothing short of a travesty, And we wanted to do something about it.”

– Tommy Badeaux

Badeaux explained in depth why the case got dismissed.
He said the league’s bylaws are structured masterfully to cover them from just about any litigation at any time.
The judge in the case ruled that Badeaux, who was suing as a season ticket holder, had no standing to force an investigation or action from NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.
Badeaux said despite commentary that indicated otherwise in national media, the suit, in no way, was filed as a publicity stunt or an attempt at attention.
He said going in, he knew it was a “long shot” that the final minutes would be replayed, but added that rule changes mark a victory in that teams are less likely to be hurt in the future by an official’s mistake in judgment.
“What happened on that infamous Sunday was nothing short of a travesty,” Badeaux said. “And we wanted to do something about it.”
For Badeaux, the path to law was paved by his Pappy.
As a toddler, Badeaux jokes and said he wanted to be a garbage man.
“I always wanted to ride on the back of that truck,” he said with a laugh.
But as he got closer to 10-11, his Pappy told him that he was smart and should be a lawyer or doctor. Badeaux said he lost two grandparents to cancer when he was 13, which spooked him out of the medical field altogether.
“I realized how much I genuinely hated hospitals,” he said.
From there, the path to being a legal leader was a personal mission — one which he chased and conquered when he passed the Bar and, created The Law Offices of Tommy Badeaux. Shortly after that, he joined the team with Frank D’Amico.
“I guess you can say that becoming a lawyer was just my way of proving my Pappy right,” Badeaux said.
He said he takes pride and joy in being able to help people who are in need of assistance in a time of need.
Badeaux said he also wants to fight back against the stigma that attorneys are sleazy and/or are only after a money grab. He said there’s far more to the job than that and many in the profession have good and pure intentions.
“I like that I get to help people on a daily basis because that is essentially what I believe being a lawyer is all centered upon,” he said. “Someone comes to you with a problem, an injury or a particular issue that they need help and/or guidance with and they seek out your professional advice and then trust you to take care of their legal needs as their advocate or their voice in a court room.” •

BY CASEY GISCLAIR

    Leave Your Comment

    Forgot Password